100 top photographers

Philip-Lorca diCorcia

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PhotoUtopia Intro: Although I am a fan of diCorcia’s photographs of male prostitutes, whom he paid their minimum fee to photograph, I worried this might be a one off idea, like a one book author; but I was proven wrong when diCorcia produced his portfolio of ‘head’ shots, these images taken by setting up a hidden flash unit, in a corner of Time Square and taking the images as the unsuspecting subject walks over an ‘X’ taped to the floor, the results are magnificently engaging works, each shot looking like a carefully staged movie still. These unknown models, going about their daily lives are suddenly thrown into the spotlight and given a suggested moment of gravitas that draws the viewer in, as if they are looking at a scene of real significants.

Wikipedia

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Philip-Lorca diCorcia (born 1951), is an American photographer. He studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Afterwards diCorcia attended Yale University where he received a Master of Fine Arts in Photography in 1979. He now lives and works in New York, and teaches at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut.[1]
diCorcia's work has been exhibited in group shows in both the United States and Europe since 1977, he participated in the traveling exhibition Pleasures and Terrors of Domestic Comfort, organized by New York's MOMA in 1991. His work was also featured in the 1997 Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and, in the 2003 exposition Cruel and Tender at London's Tate Modern. The following year diCorcia’s work was included in Fashioning Fiction in Photography Since 1990 at the MOMA.

Other site: http://www.davidzwirner.com/artists/115/
Wiki link**:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip-Lorca_diCorcia
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**@*Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. Wikimedia Foundation Inc. 1. 1. 11 - Note: Text is abridged but unaltered.
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